The trips where they hunt and fish together despite

The
“Brokeback Mountain” short story became known to the world through
the New Yorker which was published in 1997. Proulx later published her work in
a collection of short stories by the title “Close Range: Wyoming
Stories.” The production of the story as an adaptation by film-maker Ang
Lee, made the story become known all over the world despite its presence for
long. The story has been labeled as a tale-telling the world about two gay
cowboys.

The
tale unfolds between the years of 1963 and 1982 in the State of Wyoming in the
United States of America. The two main protagonists of the story are Jack and
Ennis who were hired before reaching their twenties. They were employed upon
the Brokeback Mountain. The friendship between the two young men turns into
another love affair in a society that is still shy to accept the practice. The
consolation that they give each other is meant to tolerate the act as temporary
because they confess to each other as not being queer. The two separate and
reunite for trips where they hunt and fish together despite each having a
family to take care of at their respective homes. They make such vacations to
avoid public scrutiny through which they would be hunted down and killed.
Whereas Jack was more optimistic about living as a couple, Ennis seemed to be
apprehensive in the matter. Getting caught to him would mean the end of it all.
The mountain provides the opportunity for them to engage in their affair. This
affair is disrupted by the sudden death of Jack.

We Will Write a Custom Essay Specifically
For You For Only $13.90/page!


order now

When
a major story plot is adapted for a movie shoot, the two compositions are set
apart by the fact that the film developers have to expand the narrative and
make the story longer because its actual length is shorter by comparison. In so
doing, there are individual elements screenwriters add to tell the story and
capture the emotions of the viewers. The concept of Geographic Determinism is
usually used to denote the attachment of a place to the culture of the
surrounding people.