The article I read this week was called “Federal

The article I read this week was called “Federal maps underestimate flood risk for tens of millions of people, scientists warn” by Carolyn Gramling (https://www.sciencenews.org/article/federal-maps-underestimate-flood-risk-tens-millions-people-scientists-warn). This article addresses all United States residents and also mentions a geographer at the University of Bristol in England, by the name of Oliver Wing. It goes on to talk about how the risk of floods in the U.S. and how many people it affects. It turns out, more than 400 million people live in an area that has at least a 1% chance of being flooded at any given year or moment. The U.S. Federal Emergency Management Agency, or FEMA, had originally estimated 13 million, though Wing said their calculations “miss a lot of the risk”. These calculations only include large streams and rivers, not taking into account things like thunderstorms, or heavy rainfall. Wing and his colleagues did take all other factors and data into consideration, including “U.S. Geological Survey’s river gauge data, lidar measurements of land-surface elevation, rainfall data from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, and population density maps from the Environmental Protection Agency” and estimated a total of 400 million people. Wing also stated that “Based on estimated future land development in the country, the number of people in a 1-in-100-year floodplain zone will climb to 60 million by 2050, and to 75 million by 2100, the team reported. But those figures account only for development in areas currently at risk”. Especially with climate change, the planet will continue to move and increase those numbers.I chose this article because of its placement in Earth science, and how it is something that could really be applied to most people. Knowing if you are one of those people(and chance are that you are) can help you be aware of preparedness, and encourage you to engage in it. By studying occurrences like flood, and being able to predict them, we can try to prevent them, protect against them, and lower damage. If officials of different towns, cities, etc., know this, and let people know, it will make everyone safer.